When parents and children do an activity, they do it with a certain level of comfort, challenge, or panic causing difficulty. But, they may not always notice which of the three situations they are in when they carry out an activity — comfortable, challenged, or panicking. These are called the three zones of the learning zone model — Comfort Zone, Challenge (Learning) Zone, and Panic Zone. The goal for both parents and children is to step out of their comfort zone and learn a new skill. If an activity is within their comfort zone and they keep doing only that activity, then learning is not happening.

Learning happens when they try something new, something that is challenging. Therefore, the goal is to expand the challenge zone and narrow down the panic zone. If an activity is in their panic zone, i.e., they feel stressed about it and that they feel extremely uncomfortable, they should slowly push themselves to do it and make it a part of their challenge zone, and later it becomes their comfort zone. Nevertheless, how hard and how long they should push themselves and their children to transform a panic activity into a comfortable one is an important question, and this article provides an explanation of some best practices.

Comfort Zone, Learning Zone, and Panic Zone

See the picture below that demonstrates the three zones in the learning model. When we are in the comfort zone, that is where we feel good. We are not really challenging ourselves, but we are feeling very comfortable, we are happy, and we are at peace. In the panic zone, we are freezing and being unable to do anything. When we are in the panic zone, we cannot work well, we don’t know how to think clearly, and we don’t know how to act properly. Between the comfort zone and panic zone, in the middle, is the challenge zone or otherwise called the learning zone.

The challenge zone is where we should be most often, because it is the zone where we learn. In this zone, we are doing things we are not used to, and it requires some effort, but we are able to overcome this challenge. And when we overcome some challenges in the learning zone, after a while, it becomes a part of our comfort zone. So, our challenge zone and comfort zone expand while the panic zone shrinks.

According to parenting trainers, to very well understand these zones in the learning model, you can think about the following 10 activities and determine whether you feel comfortable when doing them, or you feel challenged and are interested to overcome the challenges and learn to do them, or you panic because of the level of difficulty of the activity. I’m Yoyo, and the table below shows my answers. Draw your own table on a piece of paper and decide whether an activity is in your comfort zone, panic zone, or challenge zone.

When parents and children do an activity, they do it with a certain level of comfort, challenge, or panic causing difficulty. But, they may not always notice which of the three situations they are in when they carry out an activity — comfortable, challenged, or panicking. These are called the three zones of the learning zone model — Comfort Zone, Challenge (Learning) Zone, and Panic Zone. The goal for both parents and children is to step out of their comfort zone and learn a new skill. If an activity is within their comfort zone and they keep doing only that activity, then learning is not happening.

Learning happens when they try something new, something that is challenging. Therefore, the goal is to expand the challenge zone and narrow down the panic zone. If an activity is in their panic zone, i.e., they feel stressed about it and that they feel extremely uncomfortable, they should slowly push themselves to do it and make it a part of their challenge zone, and later it becomes their comfort zone. Nevertheless, how hard and how long they should push themselves and their children to transform a panic activity into a comfortable one is an important question, and this article provides an explanation of some best practices.

Comfort Zone, Learning Zone, and Panic Zone

See the picture below that demonstrates the three zones in the learning model. When we are in the comfort zone, that is where we feel good. We are not really challenging ourselves, but we are feeling very comfortable, we are happy, and we are at peace. In the panic zone, we are freezing and being unable to do anything. When we are in the panic zone, we cannot work well, we don’t know how to think clearly, and we don’t know how to act properly. Between the comfort zone and panic zone, in the middle, is the challenge zone or otherwise called the learning zone.

The challenge zone is where we should be most often, because it is the zone where we learn. In this zone, we are doing things we are not used to, and it requires some effort, but we are able to overcome this challenge. And when we overcome some challenges in the learning zone, after a while, it becomes a part of our comfort zone. So, our challenge zone and comfort zone expand while the panic zone shrinks.

According to parenting trainers, to very well understand these zones in the learning model, you can think about the following 10 activities and determine whether you feel comfortable when doing them, or you feel challenged and are interested to overcome the challenges and learn to do them, or you panic because of the level of difficulty of the activity. I’m Yoyo, and the table below shows my answers. Draw your own table on a piece of paper and decide whether an activity is in your comfort zone, panic zone, or challenge zone.

When parents and children do an activity, they do it with a certain level of comfort, challenge, or panic causing difficulty. But, they may not always notice which of the three situations they are in when they carry out an activity — comfortable, challenged, or panicking. These are called the three zones of the learning zone model — Comfort Zone, Challenge (Learning) Zone, and Panic Zone. The goal for both parents and children is to step out of their comfort zone and learn a new skill. If an activity is within their comfort zone and they keep doing only that activity, then learning is not happening.

Learning happens when they try something new, something that is challenging. Therefore, the goal is to expand the challenge zone and narrow down the panic zone. If an activity is in their panic zone, i.e., they feel stressed about it and that they feel extremely uncomfortable, they should slowly push themselves to do it and make it a part of their challenge zone, and later it becomes their comfort zone. Nevertheless, how hard and how long they should push themselves and their children to transform a panic activity into a comfortable one is an important question, and this article provides an explanation of some best practices.

Comfort Zone, Learning Zone, and Panic Zone

See the picture below that demonstrates the three zones in the learning model. When we are in the comfort zone, that is where we feel good. We are not really challenging ourselves, but we are feeling very comfortable, we are happy, and we are at peace. In the panic zone, we are freezing and being unable to do anything. When we are in the panic zone, we cannot work well, we don’t know how to think clearly, and we don’t know how to act properly. Between the comfort zone and panic zone, in the middle, is the challenge zone or otherwise called the learning zone.

The challenge zone is where we should be most often, because it is the zone where we learn. In this zone, we are doing things we are not used to, and it requires some effort, but we are able to overcome this challenge. And when we overcome some challenges in the learning zone, after a while, it becomes a part of our comfort zone. So, our challenge zone and comfort zone expand while the panic zone shrinks.

According to parenting trainers, to very well understand these zones in the learning model, you can think about the following 10 activities and determine whether you feel comfortable when doing them, or you feel challenged and are interested to overcome the challenges and learn to do them, or you panic because of the level of difficulty of the activity. I’m Yoyo, and the table below shows my answers. Draw your own table on a piece of paper and decide whether an activity is in your comfort zone, panic zone, or challenge zone.

When parents and children do an activity, they do it with a certain level of comfort, challenge, or panic causing difficulty. But, they may not always notice which of the three situations they are in when they carry out an activity — comfortable, challenged, or panicking. These are called the three zones of the learning zone model — Comfort Zone, Challenge (Learning) Zone, and Panic Zone. The goal for both parents and children is to step out of their comfort zone and learn a new skill. If an activity is within their comfort zone and they keep doing only that activity, then learning is not happening.

Learning happens when they try something new, something that is challenging. Therefore, the goal is to expand the challenge zone and narrow down the panic zone. If an activity is in their panic zone, i.e., they feel stressed about it and that they feel extremely uncomfortable, they should slowly push themselves to do it and make it a part of their challenge zone, and later it becomes their comfort zone. Nevertheless, how hard and how long they should push themselves and their children to transform a panic activity into a comfortable one is an important question, and this article provides an explanation of some best practices.

Comfort Zone, Learning Zone, and Panic Zone

See the picture below that demonstrates the three zones in the learning model. When we are in the comfort zone, that is where we feel good. We are not really challenging ourselves, but we are feeling very comfortable, we are happy, and we are at peace. In the panic zone, we are freezing and being unable to do anything. When we are in the panic zone, we cannot work well, we don’t know how to think clearly, and we don’t know how to act properly. Between the comfort zone and panic zone, in the middle, is the challenge zone or otherwise called the learning zone.

The challenge zone is where we should be most often, because it is the zone where we learn. In this zone, we are doing things we are not used to, and it requires some effort, but we are able to overcome this challenge. And when we overcome some challenges in the learning zone, after a while, it becomes a part of our comfort zone. So, our challenge zone and comfort zone expand while the panic zone shrinks.

According to parenting trainers, to very well understand these zones in the learning model, you can think about the following 10 activities and determine whether you feel comfortable when doing them, or you feel challenged and are interested to overcome the challenges and learn to do them, or you panic because of the level of difficulty of the activity. I’m Yoyo, and the table below shows my answers. Draw your own table on a piece of paper and decide whether an activity is in your comfort zone, panic zone, or challenge zone.

When parents and children do an activity, they do it with a certain level of comfort, challenge, or panic causing difficulty. But, they may not always notice which of the three situations they are in when they carry out an activity — comfortable, challenged, or panicking. These are called the three zones of the learning zone model — Comfort Zone, Challenge (Learning) Zone, and Panic Zone. The goal for both parents and children is to step out of their comfort zone and learn a new skill. If an activity is within their comfort zone and they keep doing only that activity, then learning is not happening.

Learning happens when they try something new, something that is challenging. Therefore, the goal is to expand the challenge zone and narrow down the panic zone. If an activity is in their panic zone, i.e., they feel stressed about it and that they feel extremely uncomfortable, they should slowly push themselves to do it and make it a part of their challenge zone, and later it becomes their comfort zone. Nevertheless, how hard and how long they should push themselves and their children to transform a panic activity into a comfortable one is an important question, and this article provides an explanation of some best practices.

Comfort Zone, Learning Zone, and Panic Zone

See the picture below that demonstrates the three zones in the learning model. When we are in the comfort zone, that is where we feel good. We are not really challenging ourselves, but we are feeling very comfortable, we are happy, and we are at peace. In the panic zone, we are freezing and being unable to do anything. When we are in the panic zone, we cannot work well, we don’t know how to think clearly, and we don’t know how to act properly. Between the comfort zone and panic zone, in the middle, is the challenge zone or otherwise called the learning zone.

The challenge zone is where we should be most often, because it is the zone where we learn. In this zone, we are doing things we are not used to, and it requires some effort, but we are able to overcome this challenge. And when we overcome some challenges in the learning zone, after a while, it becomes a part of our comfort zone. So, our challenge zone and comfort zone expand while the panic zone shrinks.

According to parenting trainers, to very well understand these zones in the learning model, you can think about the following 10 activities and determine whether you feel comfortable when doing them, or you feel challenged and are interested to overcome the challenges and learn to do them, or you panic because of the level of difficulty of the activity. I’m Yoyo, and the table below shows my answers. Draw your own table on a piece of paper and decide whether an activity is in your comfort zone, panic zone, or challenge zone.

When parents and children do an activity, they do it with a certain level of comfort, challenge, or panic causing difficulty. But, they may not always notice which of the three situations they are in when they carry out an activity — comfortable, challenged, or panicking. These are called the three zones of the learning zone model — Comfort Zone, Challenge (Learning) Zone, and Panic Zone. The goal for both parents and children is to step out of their comfort zone and learn a new skill. If an activity is within their comfort zone and they keep doing only that activity, then learning is not happening.

Learning happens when they try something new, something that is challenging. Therefore, the goal is to expand the challenge zone and narrow down the panic zone. If an activity is in their panic zone, i.e., they feel stressed about it and that they feel extremely uncomfortable, they should slowly push themselves to do it and make it a part of their challenge zone, and later it becomes their comfort zone. Nevertheless, how hard and how long they should push themselves and their children to transform a panic activity into a comfortable one is an important question, and this article provides an explanation of some best practices.

Comfort Zone, Learning Zone, and Panic Zone

See the picture below that demonstrates the three zones in the learning model. When we are in the comfort zone, that is where we feel good. We are not really challenging ourselves, but we are feeling very comfortable, we are happy, and we are at peace. In the panic zone, we are freezing and being unable to do anything. When we are in the panic zone, we cannot work well, we don’t know how to think clearly, and we don’t know how to act properly. Between the comfort zone and panic zone, in the middle, is the challenge zone or otherwise called the learning zone.

The challenge zone is where we should be most often, because it is the zone where we learn. In this zone, we are doing things we are not used to, and it requires some effort, but we are able to overcome this challenge. And when we overcome some challenges in the learning zone, after a while, it becomes a part of our comfort zone. So, our challenge zone and comfort zone expand while the panic zone shrinks.

According to parenting trainers, to very well understand these zones in the learning model, you can think about the following 10 activities and determine whether you feel comfortable when doing them, or you feel challenged and are interested to overcome the challenges and learn to do them, or you panic because of the level of difficulty of the activity. I’m Yoyo, and the table below shows my answers. Draw your own table on a piece of paper and decide whether an activity is in your comfort zone, panic zone, or challenge zone.

When parents and children do an activity, they do it with a certain level of comfort, challenge, or panic causing difficulty. But, they may not always notice which of the three situations they are in when they carry out an activity — comfortable, challenged, or panicking. These are called the three zones of the learning zone model — Comfort Zone, Challenge (Learning) Zone, and Panic Zone. The goal for both parents and children is to step out of their comfort zone and learn a new skill. If an activity is within their comfort zone and they keep doing only that activity, then learning is not happening.

Learning happens when they try something new, something that is challenging. Therefore, the goal is to expand the challenge zone and narrow down the panic zone. If an activity is in their panic zone, i.e., they feel stressed about it and that they feel extremely uncomfortable, they should slowly push themselves to do it and make it a part of their challenge zone, and later it becomes their comfort zone. Nevertheless, how hard and how long they should push themselves and their children to transform a panic activity into a comfortable one is an important question, and this article provides an explanation of some best practices.

Comfort Zone, Learning Zone, and Panic Zone

See the picture below that demonstrates the three zones in the learning model. When we are in the comfort zone, that is where we feel good. We are not really challenging ourselves, but we are feeling very comfortable, we are happy, and we are at peace. In the panic zone, we are freezing and being unable to do anything. When we are in the panic zone, we cannot work well, we don’t know how to think clearly, and we don’t know how to act properly. Between the comfort zone and panic zone, in the middle, is the challenge zone or otherwise called the learning zone.

The challenge zone is where we should be most often, because it is the zone where we learn. In this zone, we are doing things we are not used to, and it requires some effort, but we are able to overcome this challenge. And when we overcome some challenges in the learning zone, after a while, it becomes a part of our comfort zone. So, our challenge zone and comfort zone expand while the panic zone shrinks.

According to parenting trainers, to very well understand these zones in the learning model, you can think about the following 10 activities and determine whether you feel comfortable when doing them, or you feel challenged and are interested to overcome the challenges and learn to do them, or you panic because of the level of difficulty of the activity. I’m Yoyo, and the table below shows my answers. Draw your own table on a piece of paper and decide whether an activity is in your comfort zone, panic zone, or challenge zone.

When parents and children do an activity, they do it with a certain level of comfort, challenge, or panic causing difficulty. But, they may not always notice which of the three situations they are in when they carry out an activity — comfortable, challenged, or panicking. These are called the three zones of the learning zone model — Comfort Zone, Challenge (Learning) Zone, and Panic Zone. The goal for both parents and children is to step out of their comfort zone and learn a new skill. If an activity is within their comfort zone and they keep doing only that activity, then learning is not happening.

Learning happens when they try something new, something that is challenging. Therefore, the goal is to expand the challenge zone and narrow down the panic zone. If an activity is in their panic zone, i.e., they feel stressed about it and that they feel extremely uncomfortable, they should slowly push themselves to do it and make it a part of their challenge zone, and later it becomes their comfort zone. Nevertheless, how hard and how long they should push themselves and their children to transform a panic activity into a comfortable one is an important question, and this article provides an explanation of some best practices.

Comfort Zone, Learning Zone, and Panic Zone

See the picture below that demonstrates the three zones in the learning model. When we are in the comfort zone, that is where we feel good. We are not really challenging ourselves, but we are feeling very comfortable, we are happy, and we are at peace. In the panic zone, we are freezing and being unable to do anything. When we are in the panic zone, we cannot work well, we don’t know how to think clearly, and we don’t know how to act properly. Between the comfort zone and panic zone, in the middle, is the challenge zone or otherwise called the learning zone.

The challenge zone is where we should be most often, because it is the zone where we learn. In this zone, we are doing things we are not used to, and it requires some effort, but we are able to overcome this challenge. And when we overcome some challenges in the learning zone, after a while, it becomes a part of our comfort zone. So, our challenge zone and comfort zone expand while the panic zone shrinks.

According to parenting trainers, to very well understand these zones in the learning model, you can think about the following 10 activities and determine whether you feel comfortable when doing them, or you feel challenged and are interested to overcome the challenges and learn to do them, or you panic because of the level of difficulty of the activity. I’m Yoyo, and the table below shows my answers. Draw your own table on a piece of paper and decide whether an activity is in your comfort zone, panic zone, or challenge zone.

When parents and children do an activity, they do it with a certain level of comfort, challenge, or panic causing difficulty. But, they may not always notice which of the three situations they are in when they carry out an activity — comfortable, challenged, or panicking. These are called the three zones of the learning zone model — Comfort Zone, Challenge (Learning) Zone, and Panic Zone. The goal for both parents and children is to step out of their comfort zone and learn a new skill. If an activity is within their comfort zone and they keep doing only that activity, then learning is not happening.

Learning happens when they try something new, something that is challenging. Therefore, the goal is to expand the challenge zone and narrow down the panic zone. If an activity is in their panic zone, i.e., they feel stressed about it and that they feel extremely uncomfortable, they should slowly push themselves to do it and make it a part of their challenge zone, and later it becomes their comfort zone. Nevertheless, how hard and how long they should push themselves and their children to transform a panic activity into a comfortable one is an important question, and this article provides an explanation of some best practices.

Comfort Zone, Learning Zone, and Panic Zone

See the picture below that demonstrates the three zones in the learning model. When we are in the comfort zone, that is where we feel good. We are not really challenging ourselves, but we are feeling very comfortable, we are happy, and we are at peace. In the panic zone, we are freezing and being unable to do anything. When we are in the panic zone, we cannot work well, we don’t know how to think clearly, and we don’t know how to act properly. Between the comfort zone and panic zone, in the middle, is the challenge zone or otherwise called the learning zone.

The challenge zone is where we should be most often, because it is the zone where we learn. In this zone, we are doing things we are not used to, and it requires some effort, but we are able to overcome this challenge. And when we overcome some challenges in the learning zone, after a while, it becomes a part of our comfort zone. So, our challenge zone and comfort zone expand while the panic zone shrinks.

According to parenting trainers, to very well understand these zones in the learning model, you can think about the following 10 activities and determine whether you feel comfortable when doing them, or you feel challenged and are interested to overcome the challenges and learn to do them, or you panic because of the level of difficulty of the activity. I’m Yoyo, and the table below shows my answers. Draw your own table on a piece of paper and decide whether an activity is in your comfort zone, panic zone, or challenge zone.

When parents and children do an activity, they do it with a certain level of comfort, challenge, or panic causing difficulty. But, they may not always notice which of the three situations they are in when they carry out an activity — comfortable, challenged, or panicking. These are called the three zones of the learning zone model — Comfort Zone, Challenge (Learning) Zone, and Panic Zone. The goal for both parents and children is to step out of their comfort zone and learn a new skill. If an activity is within their comfort zone and they keep doing only that activity, then learning is not happening.

Learning happens when they try something new, something that is challenging. Therefore, the goal is to expand the challenge zone and narrow down the panic zone. If an activity is in their panic zone, i.e., they feel stressed about it and that they feel extremely uncomfortable, they should slowly push themselves to do it and make it a part of their challenge zone, and later it becomes their comfort zone. Nevertheless, how hard and how long they should push themselves and their children to transform a panic activity into a comfortable one is an important question, and this article provides an explanation of some best practices.

Comfort Zone, Learning Zone, and Panic Zone

See the picture below that demonstrates the three zones in the learning model. When we are in the comfort zone, that is where we feel good. We are not really challenging ourselves, but we are feeling very comfortable, we are happy, and we are at peace. In the panic zone, we are freezing and being unable to do anything. When we are in the panic zone, we cannot work well, we don’t know how to think clearly, and we don’t know how to act properly. Between the comfort zone and panic zone, in the middle, is the challenge zone or otherwise called the learning zone.

The challenge zone is where we should be most often, because it is the zone where we learn. In this zone, we are doing things we are not used to, and it requires some effort, but we are able to overcome this challenge. And when we overcome some challenges in the learning zone, after a while, it becomes a part of our comfort zone. So, our challenge zone and comfort zone expand while the panic zone shrinks.

According to parenting trainers, to very well understand these zones in the learning model, you can think about the following 10 activities and determine whether you feel comfortable when doing them, or you feel challenged and are interested to overcome the challenges and learn to do them, or you panic because of the level of difficulty of the activity. I’m Yoyo, and the table below shows my answers. Draw your own table on a piece of paper and decide whether an activity is in your comfort zone, panic zone, or challenge zone.

When parents and children do an activity, they do it with a certain level of comfort, challenge, or panic causing difficulty. But, they may not always notice which of the three situations they are in when they carry out an activity — comfortable, challenged, or panicking. These are called the three zones of the learning zone model — Comfort Zone, Challenge (Learning) Zone, and Panic Zone. The goal for both parents and children is to step out of their comfort zone and learn a new skill. If an activity is within their comfort zone and they keep doing only that activity, then learning is not happening.

Learning happens when they try something new, something that is challenging. Therefore, the goal is to expand the challenge zone and narrow down the panic zone. If an activity is in their panic zone, i.e., they feel stressed about it and that they feel extremely uncomfortable, they should slowly push themselves to do it and make it a part of their challenge zone, and later it becomes their comfort zone. Nevertheless, how hard and how long they should push themselves and their children to transform a panic activity into a comfortable one is an important question, and this article provides an explanation of some best practices.

Comfort Zone, Learning Zone, and Panic Zone

See the picture below that demonstrates the three zones in the learning model. When we are in the comfort zone, that is where we feel good. We are not really challenging ourselves, but we are feeling very comfortable, we are happy, and we are at peace. In the panic zone, we are freezing and being unable to do anything. When we are in the panic zone, we cannot work well, we don’t know how to think clearly, and we don’t know how to act properly. Between the comfort zone and panic zone, in the middle, is the challenge zone or otherwise called the learning zone.

The challenge zone is where we should be most often, because it is the zone where we learn. In this zone, we are doing things we are not used to, and it requires some effort, but we are able to overcome this challenge. And when we overcome some challenges in the learning zone, after a while, it becomes a part of our comfort zone. So, our challenge zone and comfort zone expand while the panic zone shrinks.

According to parenting trainers, to very well understand these zones in the learning model, you can think about the following 10 activities and determine whether you feel comfortable when doing them, or you feel challenged and are interested to overcome the challenges and learn to do them, or you panic because of the level of difficulty of the activity. I’m Yoyo, and the table below shows my answers. Draw your own table on a piece of paper and decide whether an activity is in your comfort zone, panic zone, or challenge zone.

When parents and children do an activity, they do it with a certain level of comfort, challenge, or panic causing difficulty. But, they may not always notice which of the three situations they are in when they carry out an activity — comfortable, challenged, or panicking. These are called the three zones of the learning zone model — Comfort Zone, Challenge (Learning) Zone, and Panic Zone. The goal for both parents and children is to step out of their comfort zone and learn a new skill. If an activity is within their comfort zone and they keep doing only that activity, then learning is not happening.

Learning happens when they try something new, something that is challenging. Therefore, the goal is to expand the challenge zone and narrow down the panic zone. If an activity is in their panic zone, i.e., they feel stressed about it and that they feel extremely uncomfortable, they should slowly push themselves to do it and make it a part of their challenge zone, and later it becomes their comfort zone. Nevertheless, how hard and how long they should push themselves and their children to transform a panic activity into a comfortable one is an important question, and this article provides an explanation of some best practices.

Comfort Zone, Learning Zone, and Panic Zone

See the picture below that demonstrates the three zones in the learning model. When we are in the comfort zone, that is where we feel good. We are not really challenging ourselves, but we are feeling very comfortable, we are happy, and we are at peace. In the panic zone, we are freezing and being unable to do anything. When we are in the panic zone, we cannot work well, we don’t know how to think clearly, and we don’t know how to act properly. Between the comfort zone and panic zone, in the middle, is the challenge zone or otherwise called the learning zone.

The challenge zone is where we should be most often, because it is the zone where we learn. In this zone, we are doing things we are not used to, and it requires some effort, but we are able to overcome this challenge. And when we overcome some challenges in the learning zone, after a while, it becomes a part of our comfort zone. So, our challenge zone and comfort zone expand while the panic zone shrinks.

According to parenting trainers, to very well understand these zones in the learning model, you can think about the following 10 activities and determine whether you feel comfortable when doing them, or you feel challenged and are interested to overcome the challenges and learn to do them, or you panic because of the level of difficulty of the activity. I’m Yoyo, and the table below shows my answers. Draw your own table on a piece of paper and decide whether an activity is in your comfort zone, panic zone, or challenge zone.

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